Correlação entre dietas sem grãos e cardiopatias

Olá colegas, em anexo um artigo que alerta para a evidência da correlação entre dietas industriais livres de grãos e cardiomiopatias em raças caninas que já tendem à cardiomiopatia dilatada, mas não apenas estas: segundo o artigo, esta patologia está sendo verificada mesmo em raças que não tendem a desenvolver a doença. Alguém saberia explicar tecnicamente a correlação? Obrigada! 😘👍🏼 https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/cvm-updates/fda-investigating-potential-connection-between-diet-and-cases-canine-heart-disease?fbclid=IwAR0P8V8U2xQAv7uQCF1UYKhFm6Q0r8SRatQkt5Jijg9ie4s0cGDMsbUaVRs

Responda a pergunta de Chris Mintenbeck

Não logado
Visitante
Inserir mais anexos

Há 5 respostas para esta pergunta

equipe
Rita Carmona
Equipe Vetsapiens
Resposta:
Dra Chris, muito obrigada por sua pergunta tão importante. Já acionamos nossos colaboradores das áreas de cardiologia e nutrologia que poderão te ajudar nessa questão.
Anexos: 0
11 de dezembro de 2020 às 10:40
Nenhum anexo enviado.
equipe
Paola Lazaretti
Equipe Vetsapiens
Resposta:
Oi Chris, ainda nao temos uma explicacao exata sobre a fisiopatologia da cardiomiopatia observada nestes caes, a maioria deles eram Golden retrievers, mas outras racas tambem foram acometidas, alias em quase todos os hospitais que eu trabalho aqui no Texas temos um ou dois casos de cardiomiopatia dilatada com historico de dietas nao convencionais que estao sendo inveestigados. Investigam a deficiencia de Taurina, mas parece que isto nao foi muito consistente em todos os casos. Short-Term Outcome of a Prospective Study of Diet-Associated Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) in Dogs 2020 ACVIM Forum On Demand Lisa M. Freeman, John Rush, Darcy Adin, Kelsey Weeks, Kristen Antoon, Sara Brethel, Suzanne Cunningham, Luis dos Santos, Renee Girens, Emily Karlin, Katherine Lopez, Camden Rouben, Michelle Vereb, Vicky Yang1 1Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University; 2College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida Objective: To evaluate serial changes in echocardiography and cardiac biomarkers in dogs with suspected diet-associated DCM, after diet change. Dogs with DCM [M-mode fractional shortening (FS) ≤25%, normalized LVIDd ≥1.8, and normalized LVIDs (nLVIDs) ≥1.2] eating either a non-traditional or traditional diet were enrolled in a 9-month study. Echocardiography,ECG, high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (cTnI), NT-proBNP, and taurine were measured at baseline. Dogs were treated with cardiac medications as clinically indicated, diet was changed,and echocardiography and biomarker analyses were repeated after 3, 6, and 9 months. As of January, 2020, 59 dogs have been enrolled (36 M/23 F). Median age=7.7 yrs (2.6–15.9 yrs) and weight was 32.0 kg (3.8–97.8 kg). Enrolled breeds included Doberman Pinscher (n=14), Golden Retriever (n=7), Pit Bull (n=6), and Boxer (n=6), but multiple other breeds were represented. Dogs were ACVIM Stage C (n=45) or Stage B (n=14). Fifty-one of 59 dogs (86.4%) were eating non-traditional diets. Six of 59 dogs had mildly reduced plasma (n=3) or whole blood (n=3) taurine concentrations. To date, 41 of 42 dogs still alive were re-evaluated at 3 months (23 at 6 months, 16 at 9 months). At 3 months, dogs originally eating nontraditional diets had increased FS (p
Anexos: 0
11 de dezembro de 2020 às 12:02
Nenhum anexo enviado.
equipe
Paola Lazaretti
Equipe Vetsapiens
Resposta:
Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Dogs: Is It Diet Related? 42nd Annual OAVT Conference & Trade Show Vicky Ograin, MBA, RVT, VTS (Nutrition) Academy of Veterinary Nutrition Technicians Introduction Cases of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) have increased in recent years. These cases are atypical, which has prompted the FDA to put out alerts to warn pet owners to be aware of certain types of ingredients and diets that seemed to be overrepresented in these atypical cases. This has brought about the hypothesis that certain ingredients and diets may be causing the disease. To date nothing has been confirmed, so this paper will discuss the different hypotheses for what may be causing nutritional dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) As of June 2019, the FDA has submitted three reports on the increased number of cases of DCM in dogs. The first was reported on July 12, 2018. FDA-CVM (USA) issued a statement warning dog owners about a potential connection between diet and cases of DCM.1 The FDA was receiving reports of cases of DCM in dogs eating foods with peas, lentils, other legume seeds and potato as the main ingredient in the food. They were seeing this in atypical breeds not seen in the past for genetic DCM.1 The FDA submitted a follow-up report on February 19, 2019. The FDA updated pet owners to alert them that they were collaborating with multiple organizations in animal health to investigate the unusual cases.2 The third FDA update was on June 27, 2019. This time they gave specific information about the diets the dogs were eating. The report identified 16 brands that had 10 or more cases. Of the reported foods, 91% were grain free, 93% contained peas and/or lentils, 89% had peas, 62% had lentils and 42% had potatoes.3 All were formulated foods. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the heart muscle which causes the heart to weaken and dilate. This causes the heart muscle to become thin, so the heart cannot pump as efficiently, causing retention of blood and fluids. The heart tries to compensate, but in time DCM can lead to heart failure.4 Risk Factors In non-nutritional DCM the typical age of onset is 4–10 years.5 The FDA has reported cases of nutritional DCM as young as 4 months to as old as 16 years.1 Males are reported more than females.6 Doberman pinschers, boxers, Irish wolfhounds, and Great Danes are thought to be genetically predisposed to dilated cardiomyopathy.7 Goldens and American cocker spaniels may have a taurine deficiency; additionally, large-breed dogs may be prone to taurine deficiency (for example, Newfoundlands, English setters, Saint Bernards, and Irish wolfhounds).8 In the FDA report dated June 27, 2019, many breeds were reported, including breeds thought to be genetically predisposed and atypical breeds that have not been reported as being predisposed in the past. Signs Early in the disease there may be no signs. The owner may possibly see exercise intolerance.9 As the disease progresses the owner may see weakness, loss of appetite, coughing and difficulty breathing.10 Unfortunately, there can be sudden death.11 The veterinarian may hear a heart murmur with irregular heart rhythm and increased blood pressure as well as chest and abdominal fluid. This could lead to heart failure.9 Diagnostics To diagnose DCM the veterinarian will perform a physical exam, including a thorough diet history. The veterinarian will check for an increased heart rate and/or an arrhythmia. Chest x-ray and EKG may be performed. The chest x-ray may show an enlarged heart or possibly fluid in the lungs or chest. Interestingly, the chest x-rays may be normal, but you could still see arrhythmias on the EKG. Echocardiogram is the best diagnostics tool.10 Lab work should be taken, including a general profile, CBC and chemistry. The vet may also include a NT-ProBNP. NT-ProBNP is used for dogs with suspected heart disease. If the results are 1,800 pmol/L or higher, the signs are likely due to heart disease, and more tests are indicated.11 Taurine testing should be performed, but it is important to know that some dogs have had symptoms of nutritional DCM but have had a normal taurine—this is why an echocardiogram is the best test to diagnose DCM. Whole blood and plasma taurine tests are available; if available, it is best to do both tests. If the owner can only do one test, then whole blood is recommended. Whole blood gives a better indication of long-term taurine status. For whole blood, a result of ≤200 nmol/ml is considered low, and ≤60 nmol/ml is considered low for plasma. Normal whole blood taurine is >250 nmol/ml, and normal plasma is >70 nmol/ml.12 Also, if there are other dogs eating the same food causing DCM in housemates, it is recommended to screen these dogs as well, even if not showing symptoms. Follow-up echocardiograms should be performed at 3–6 months to monitor the condition.8 Treatment Treatment is multimodal in helping dogs diagnosed with DCM. A variety of medications can be prescribed: antioxidants to help with oxidative damage, L-carnitine, and omega-3 fatty acids (from fish oil). It is also important to supplement with taurine. Limiting exercise may be warranted.10 If the dog has been diagnosed with possible nutritional DCM, it is recommended to switch the dog to a well-established diet that meets WSAVA (World Small Animal Veterinary Association) guidelines. This would be recommended for all dogs in the house eating the suspect diet.8 Potential Nutritional Causes with Abnormal Taurine There are many hypotheses as to why dogs are getting DCM with an abnormal taurine level. Could the diet be deficient in methionine and cystine, resulting in reduced synthesis of taurine? Or could the diet be deficient in taurine or have lower bioavailability of taurine, methionine or cystine in the dog food? Could fiber content be causing abnormal enterohepatic recycling of bile acids? Could there be higher urinary loss of taurine, or could interactions between certain dietary components and intestinal microbes be causing altered metabolism of taurine in the intestines? Could there be a breed-related genetic component that is contributing to taurine deficiency in some of these cases?8 Potential Nutritional Causes with Normal Taurine There can be deficiency of certain nutrients that are altered because of a nutrient–nutrient interactions or deficiency due to reduced bioavailability. This could especially be a concern for exotic ingredients that have little to no testing, so nutrients and bioavailability are not well known, especially compared to grains, which have been well researched in the livestock and pet food industry. Causes being investigated for cases where the taurine is normal include other deficiencies in the implicated diets, such as choline, copper, L-carnitine, magnesium, thiamine, vitamin E or selenium. There are potentially even more causes, such as interactions between ingredients and the gut microbiota.8 Whole-blood taurine can be affected by the platelet count, which can vary depending on the immune status and whole-blood taurine. Whole-blood taurine may not reflect taurine in muscle, including cardiac muscle. This may explain why some dogs diagnosed with DCM have normal whole blood taurine concentrations.14 Antinutritional Effects There is little known about some of these exotic ingredients—could there be an inadvertent inclusion of toxic ingredients?6 It is possible that antinutritional effects could lead to DCM due to imbalances; therefore, the dog would not receive all the required nutrients. Carbohydrate sources like legumes and raw cereals contain antinutritional factors like trypsin inhibitors, phytates, hemoagglutinins, and polyphenols that can decrease nutrient absorption and protein digestibility. Cooking can destroy these antinutritional affects. For example, trypsin inhibitor can be destroyed during the extrusion process. At 150°C trypsin inhibitor was decreased by 94%. The Maillard reaction can cause heat damage to proteins. Heat-damaged proteins can greatly overestimate bioavailability.13 It is thought that the Maillard reaction may increase microbial degradation of taurine in the large intestines. A pet food company also needs to take into effect processing and production that could affect nutrients. Amino Acids: Methionine, Cysteine and Taurine Methionine and cysteine are sulfur amino acids. Together they synthesize to make taurine, mostly in the liver. Methionine is an essential amino acid, meaning they must get it from their diet. Methionine synthesizes to make cysteine, so cysteine is not considered essential unless there is not enough methionine to produce cysteine. If there is not enough cysteine, half of the requirement can be met with methionine, but it cannot replace all of the requirement, so there still needs to be some cysteine.14 Heat can damage and lower bioavailability of methionine. Therefore, it is important that the dog receive enough in their diet.14 Methionine supplies sulfur for skin, hair and nails, produces adenosylmethionine (SAMe), decreases urine pH, and is a powerful antioxidant. Cysteine is not soluble in urine, so it can form crystals and uroliths. Cysteine uroliths are rare and have been reported in breeds such as English bulldogs and Newfoundlands. Methionine and cysteine are found in animal proteins, such as muscle, organs and eggs, with lower levels found in casein, grains and pulses. Diets with proteins that are poorly digestible may not supply enough methionine and cysteine, even if the protein levels meet AAFCO minimums.15 Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid. It is synthesized from sulfur amino acids methionine and cysteine, mostly in the liver and central nervous system. Taurine is unable to form peptide bonds, so does not synthesized into protein. Taurine is found as a free amino acid in high concentrations in the heart; 60% of the taurine supply can be found in the heart. Heat can destroy this important amino acid, so this needs to be taken into account when developing a complete and balanced diet.16 Taurine is found in the heart, retina, liver, brain, skeletal muscle, platelets, leukocytes and fluids such as milk and in complexes with bile salts.6 There are low levels of taurine in lamb. Plant-based ingredients contain no taurine. Taurine is involved with body temperature regulation; assists with absorption of fat through conjugation of bile acids; and serves as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in the central nervous system. It has a role in reproduction, fetal and brain development, and normal retinal and heart function. Taurine also serves as an antioxidant, stabilizes cell membranes and regulates cell volume and osmolarity.6 It is thought that taurine helps with the reabsorption of calcium; therefore, if there is a deficiency of methionine and cysteine with a low synthesis of taurine, this can deplete calcium pools in the cardiac cells and hinder proper contraction of cardiac muscle tissue, possibly resulting in DCM.13 Taurine deficiency includes reproductive failure in queens, developmental abnormalities in kittens, central retinal degeneration and dilated cardiomyopathy.6 Carnitine L-carnitine is an amino acid derivative or vitamin-like substance. It facilitates the uptake of free fatty acids into the mitochondria to produce ATP. The body must have carnitine for adequate energy production in cardiac muscle. L-carnitine is a powerful antioxidant. It is involved in a variety of other functions, including fat metabolism. It is synthesized from lysine and methionine primarily in the liver.6 L-carnitine is found in muscle; heart and skeletal muscle contain 95% to 98% of L-carnitine in the body. Deficiencies of L-carnitine include cardiomyopathy. Most dogs with DCM and an L-carnitine deficiency have myopathic L-carnitine, which means they have a membrane transport defect that prevents enough L-carnitine from moving into the myocardium from the plasma. L-carnitine is not found in plants, so a vegetarian diet could be deficient.6 BEG Diets The diets that have recently been implicated have been coined B.E.G. diets by Lisa Freeman, DVM, PhD, DACVN, a boarded veterinary nutritionist at Tufts University. B.E.G. diet stands for boutique, exotic, and grain-free. These are boutique (small, niche pet-food company), exotic (a pet food using ingredients not traditionally used in pet food, like kangaroo, alligator, bison, fava beans, tapioca, quinoa, lamb [which has low bioavailable cysteine] or chickpeas) and grain free (replacing grain carbohydrates ingredients with vegetable carbohydrate sources, like potatoes, peas, legumes).8 We do not know much about these ingredients. Are they decreased in taurine or have reduced availability of taurine? Do they have decreased bioavailability or digestibility? Grains have been researched for years in the livestock and pet food industry; understanding of nutrients and how the body digests are well known. We do not know a lot about the exotic ingredients; nutrients and bioavailability will differ.8 Legumes have been used more of late, especially in grain-free foods. Legumes are ingredients like soybeans and fava beans; they also use pulses, which are the seeds of legume plants (ingredients like peas, lentils, chickpeas and dry beans). Legumes are low in fat, but high in protein and fiber, so they are a great ingredient to use to keep the fat content down while supplying protein and fiber. Legumes are high in lysine and low in methionine. In a study using soybean at 15% DMB there was decreased protein digestibility. Legumes have been reported to be 40% or more of the diet.13 Complete and Balanced Diets When developing a complete and balanced diet, the formulator must take all ingredients into account. If a lot is not known about all of the nutrients in the food, processing and production the food may be complete and balanced on paper, but not in the actual nutrients, which could pose a problem in the dog. AAFCO Statement If the company is in the U.S. and selling across state lines, plus many provinces in Canada, they must follow AAFCO. The pet food label must have a nutritional adequacy statement (AAFCO statement). The nutritional adequacy statement tells you a lot about how the food was made. The pet food company cannot change the AAFCO statement; it is a verbatim statement. There are four recognized life stages: all life stage (puppy/kitten food), gestation/lactation, growth, and adult maintenance. There is no nutritional adequacy statement for senior/mature dogs. The AAFCO statement also tells how the food was developed, by feeding trial, formulated, family or intermittent/supplemental. Pet food companies are required to complete an affidavit confirming they have completed a feeding trial, formulation or family product. This is not required for an intermittent/supplemental food.17 AAFCO Feeding Trials There is no requirement to do a feeding trial; it is up to the company. AAFCO sets the guidelines for how to complete a feeding trial. A feeding trial include dogs on the test food, a control food and a group of dogs to develop the colony norms for the required lab work. Food consumption and weight are recorded, and lab work is required. An adult feeding trial lasts 6 months, and a puppy trial lasts 10 weeks. A feeding trial shows the formula is complete and balanced, as the sole source of nutrition. Every five years a company must recertify feeding trials; they need to test six different lots for nutrients. To maintain the feeding trial statement, 95% of the key nutrients must be identical to the original nutrients. If the company does not have the original nutrient profile, the company will need to complete a new full feeding trial protocol.17 AAFCO Formulated Diets A formulated food has to minimally meet AAFCO minimums and a few maximums, using commonly used non-purified complex ingredients. The last update to the profiles was 2016. According to AAFCO there is an expected digestibility, and the pet food company needs to take into account losses during processing and storage. The nutrients are what is expected when the dog eats the food.17 AAFCO Intermittent/Supplemental Intermittent/supplemental foods are intended for short-term or supplemental feeding. Pet foods labeled as a treat or snack do not have to meet the nutrient profiles, unless labeled as a complete and balanced food. A food could appear to be complete and balanced, but is not. It is important to look at the nutritional adequacy statement to confirm it is complete and balanced. If a wellness food (pet store or grocery food) is an intermittent/supplemental food, it should account for no more than 10% of the total diet.17 Feeding Enough It is important to make sure the dog is eating enough, meaning their daily energy requirements (DER) for the day. If not, the dog may have potential deficiencies in taurine and other nutrients causing potential malnutrition. If eating the full DER, is the food complete and balanced? If the food is an intermittent/supplemental food, there could be deficiencies of nutrients. Pet owners need to read the nutritional adequacy (AAFCO) statement to make sure the food is complete and balanced. Veterinary and Pet Owner Resources There are many resources for veterinarians, veterinary technicians and pet owners. FDA: Keep up with the latest FDA reports, along with the previous reports. www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/NewsEvents/CVMUpdates/ucm613305.htm Blogs: Dr. Lisa Freeman, a boarded veterinary nutritionist, has a great blog that veterinary health care team and pet owners will find valuable. Petfoodology, Tufts Veterinary School. http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/petfoodology UC Davis—Dr. Josh Stern: Dr. Stern is a boarded veterinary cardiologist who is studying DCM and has some great resources for clinics to use or for pet owners; these include lab work and treatment suggestions. www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/news/uc-davis-investigates-link-between-dog-diets-and-deadly-heart-disease Facebook closed groups: There are some great Facebook pages that provide support. Taurine-Deficient (Nutritional) Dilated Cardiomyopathy: This is a closed page for pet owners, breeders, veterinary professionals and pet food company employees. www.facebook.com/groups/TaurineDCM (VIN editor: original link was modified on 1-31-20) Taurine Deficiency Veterinary Professionals: A closed page for veterinarians or vet techs. www.facebook.com/groups/355294525012651 Taurine Deficiency in Golden Retrievers: A closed page for Golden owners only. www.facebook.com/groups/1257656451030324 Taurine-Deficient Cardiomyopathy Reference: An open page that has DCM references. www.facebook.com/taurineconcerns Taurine DCM—Website: These Facebook groups also have a website; this is especially great if not on Facebook. https://taurinedcm.org What to Ask a Pet Food Company Many pet owners are confused about what to feed their dogs. Many boarded nutritionists and cardiologists recommend looking for a pet food that follows the WSAVA (World Small Animal Veterinary Association) guidelines. On their websites they have questions to ask your pet food company. These were first proposed by AAHA (American Animal Hospital Association) in 2010,18 and WSAVA came out with guidelines in 2011.19 Have the pet owner call the pet food company to ask the suggested questions. 1. Do you have a veterinary nutritionist or some equivalent on staff in your company? Are they available for consultation or questions? 2. Who formulates your diets, and what are their credentials? 3. Which of your diet(s) are tested using AAFCO feeding trials, and which by nutrient analysis? 4. What specific quality control measures do you use to assure the consistency and quality of your product line? 5. Where are your diets produced and manufactured? Can this plant be visited? 6. Will you provide a complete product nutrient analysis of your best-selling dog and cat food, including digestibility values? 7. What is the caloric value per can or cup of your diets? 8. What kind of research on your products has been conducted, and are the results published in peer-reviewed studies? Summary Nutritional DCM is on the rise. There is so much that goes into making a complete and balanced pet food, from formulation, digestibility and bioavailability to understanding the nutrients in ingredients and processing and production. Until we understand what is going on, carefully selecting a dog’s food is important. Pet owners need to work with the veterinary health care team and to ask the pet food companies the questions recommended by AAHA-WSAVA to find a pet food for their dog. References 1. www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/cvm-updates/fda-investigating-potential-connection-between-diet-and-cases-canine-heart-disease. 2. www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/cvm-updates/fda-provides-update-investigation-potential-connection-between-certain-diets-and-cases-canine-heart. 3. www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/cvm-updates/fda-provides-third-status-report-investigation-potential-connection-between-certain-diets-and-cases. 4. www.morrisanimalfoundation.org/article/researchers-getting-closer-understanding-dietary-taurine-and-heart-disease-dogs. 5. Hand, Thatcher, Remillard, Roudebush, Novotny. Small Animal Clinical Nutrition. 5th ed. Topeka, KS: Mark Morris Institute; 2010: 49–105, 107–148, 184, 368, 516, 723, 733–763. 6. www.vet.upenn.edu/docs/default-source/ryan/cardiology-brochures-%28ryan%29/understanding-canine-dilated-cardiomyopathy.pdf?sfvrsn=0. 7. http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2018/06/a-broken-heart-risk-of-heart-disease-in-boutique-or-grain-free-diets-and-exotic-ingredients. 8. Freeman LM, Stern JA, Fries J, et al. Diet-associated dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs: what do we know? J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2018 Dec 1;253(11):1390–1394. 9. www.vetmed.wsu.edu/outreach/Pet-Health-Topics/categories/diseases/dilated-cardiomyopathy-in-dogs. 10. www.acvim.org/Animal-Owners/Animal-Education/Health-Fact-Sheets/Cardiology/Dilated-Cardiomyopathy. 11. www.idexx.com/files/cardiopet-interpretive-criteria-canine.pdf. 12. Stern, JA. Frequently requested information regarding taurine & dilated cardiomyopathy in Golden retrievers, August 9, 2018. 13. Mansilla WD, Marinangeli CPF, Ekenstedt KJ, et al. Special topic: the association between pulse ingredients and canine dilated cardiomyopathy: addressing the knowledge gaps before establishing causation. J Anim Sci. 2019;97(3):983–997. doi:10.1093/jas/sky488 14. Case LP, Daristotle L, Hayek MG, et al. Canine and Feline Nutrition: A Resource for Companion Animal Professionals. 3rd ed. St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier; 2011: 89–106. 15. Butterwick R, Burger I, Morris P, et al. Methionine and Cystine—Nutrition, Wiki Vet English, Waltham May 19, 2015. 16. Backus RC, Suk Ko K, Fascetti AJ, et al. Low plasma taurine concentration in Newfoundland dogs is associated with low plasma methionine and cyst(e)ine concentrations and low taurine synthesis, J. Nutr. 2006:136:2525–2533. 17. Association of American Feed Control Officials. AAFCO 2020 Official Publication: pp 148, 155–227. 18. www.aaha.org/aaha-guidelines/nutritional-assessment-configuration/nutritional-assessment-introduction. 19. www.wsava.org/WSAVA/media/Documents/Guidelines/WSAVA-Nutrition-Assessment-Guidelines-2011-JSAP.pdf.
Anexos: 0
11 de dezembro de 2020 às 12:12
Nenhum anexo enviado.
equipe
Paola Lazaretti
Equipe Vetsapiens
Traducao by google para facilitar... eu sei que voce nao precisa, Chris, mas pode ajudar alguem... Cardiomiopatia dilatada em cães: está relacionada à dieta? 42ª Conferência e Feira Anual da OAVT Vicky Ograin, MBA, RVT, VTS (Nutrition) Academy of Veterinary Nutrition Technicians Introdução Os casos de cardiomiopatia dilatada (DCM) aumentaram nos últimos anos. Esses casos são atípicos, o que levou a FDA a divulgar alertas para alertar os donos de animais de estimação a estarem cientes de certos tipos de ingredientes e dietas que pareciam estar superrepresentados nesses casos atípicos. Isso levantou a hipótese de que certos ingredientes e dietas podem estar causando a doença. Até o momento nada foi confirmado, então este artigo discutirá as diferentes hipóteses sobre o que pode estar causando a cardiomiopatia dilatada nutricional em cães. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Em junho de 2019, o FDA apresentou três relatórios sobre o aumento do número de casos de DCM em cães. O primeiro foi relatado em 12 de julho de 2018. O FDA-CVM (EUA) emitiu uma declaração alertando os proprietários de cães sobre uma possível conexão entre dieta e casos de DCM.1 O FDA estava recebendo relatos de casos de DCM em cães comendo alimentos com ervilhas, lentilhas, outras sementes de leguminosas e batata como o ingrediente principal da comida. Eles estavam vendo isso em raças atípicas não vistas no passado para DCM genético.1 O FDA apresentou um relatório de acompanhamento em 19 de fevereiro de 2019. O FDA atualizou os proprietários de animais de estimação para alertá-los de que estavam colaborando com várias organizações em saúde animal para investigar os casos incomuns.2 A terceira atualização do FDA foi em 27 de junho de 2019. Desta vez, eles deram informações específicas sobre as dietas que os cães estavam comendo. O relatório identificou 16 marcas que tiveram 10 ou mais casos. Dos alimentos relatados, 91% eram isentos de grãos, 93% continham ervilhas e / ou lentilhas, 89% comiam ervilhas, 62% com lentilhas e 42% com batatas.3 Todos eram alimentos formulados. Cardiomiopatia dilatada A cardiomiopatia dilatada (DCM) é uma doença do músculo cardíaco que causa o enfraquecimento e a dilatação do coração. Isso faz com que o músculo cardíaco fique fino, de modo que o coração não possa bombear com a mesma eficiência, causando retenção de sangue e fluidos. O coração tenta compensar, mas com o tempo o DCM pode levar à insuficiência cardíaca.4 Fatores de risco No DCM não nutricional, a idade típica de início é de 4 a 10 anos.5 O FDA relatou casos de DCM nutricional desde os 4 meses até os 16 anos.1 Homens são relatados mais do que mulheres.6 Doberman pinschers, boxers, wolfhounds irlandeses e Great Danes são considerados geneticamente predispostos à cardiomiopatia dilatada.7 Goldens e cocker spaniels americanos podem ter uma deficiência de taurina; além disso, os cães de raças grandes podem ser propensos à deficiência de taurina (por exemplo, Newfoundlands, setters ingleses, Saint Bernards e wolfhounds irlandeses).8 No relatório da FDA datado de 27 de junho de 2019, muitas raças foram relatadas, incluindo raças consideradas geneticamente predispostas e raças atípicas que não foram relatadas como predispostas no passado. Sinais No início da doença, pode não haver sinais. O proprietário pode ver intolerância ao exercício.9 À medida que a doença progride, o proprietário pode observar fraqueza, perda de apetite, tosse e dificuldade em respirar.10 Infelizmente, pode haver morte súbita.11 O veterinário pode ouvir um sopro cardíaco com ritmo cardíaco irregular e aumento da pressão arterial, bem como fluido torácico e abdominal. Isso pode levar à insuficiência cardíaca.9 Diagnóstico Para diagnosticar DCM, o veterinário realizará um exame físico, incluindo um histórico completo da dieta. O veterinário verificará se há aumento da freqüência cardíaca e / ou arritmia. Radiografia de tórax e EKG podem ser realizados. A radiografia de tórax pode mostrar um coração dilatado ou possivelmente fluido nos pulmões ou no tórax. Curiosamente, as radiografias de tórax podem ser normais, mas você ainda pode ver arritmias no EKG. O ecocardiograma é a melhor ferramenta de diagnóstico.10 Trabalho de laboratório deve ser realizado, incluindo um perfil geral, CBC e química. O veterinário também pode incluir um NT-ProBNP. O NT-ProBNP é usado em cães com suspeita de doença cardíaca. Se os resultados forem 1.800 pmol / L ou mais, os sinais provavelmente serão causados ​​por doenças cardíacas e mais exames serão indicados.11 O teste de taurina deve ser realizado, mas é importante saber que alguns cães apresentaram sintomas de DCM nutricional, mas tiveram uma taurina normal - é por isso que um ecocardiograma é o melhor teste para diagnosticar DCM. Testes de taurina de sangue total e plasma estão disponíveis; se disponível, é melhor fazer os dois testes. Se o proprietário puder fazer apenas um teste, o sangue total é recomendado. O sangue total fornece uma indicação melhor do status da taurina em longo prazo. Para o sangue total, um resultado ≤200 nmol / ml é considerado baixo, e ≤60 nmol / ml é considerado baixo para o plasma. A taurina normal no sangue total é> 250 nmol / ml e o plasma normal é> 70 nmol / ml.12 Além disso, se houver outros cães comendo a mesma comida causando DCM em colegas de casa, é recomendável rastrear esses cães também, mesmo se não apresentarem sintomas. Ecocardiogramas de acompanhamento devem ser realizados em 3-6 meses para monitorar a condição.8 Tratamento O tratamento é multimodal para ajudar os cães com diagnóstico de DCM. Uma variedade de medicamentos pode ser prescrita: antioxidantes para ajudar no dano oxidativo, L-carnitina e ácidos graxos ômega-3 (do óleo de peixe). Também é importante suplementar com taurina. Limitar o exercício pode ser justificado.10 Se o cão foi diagnosticado com possível DCM nutricional, é recomendado mudar o cão para uma dieta bem estabelecida que atenda às diretrizes da WSAVA (World Small Animal Veterinary Association). Isso seria recomendado para todos os cães da casa que estivessem comendo a dieta suspeita.8 Potenciais causas nutricionais com taurina anormal Existem muitas hipóteses sobre o motivo pelo qual os cães estão recebendo DCM com um nível anormal de taurina. A dieta poderia ser deficiente em metionina e cistina, resultando em síntese reduzida de taurina? Ou a dieta poderia ser deficiente em taurina ou ter menor biodisponibilidade de taurina, metionina ou cistina na comida de cachorro? O conteúdo de fibra pode estar causando a reciclagem entero-hepática anormal de ácidos biliares? Pode haver maior perda urinária de taurina, ou as interações entre certos componentes da dieta e micróbios intestinais podem estar causando o metabolismo alterado da taurina nos intestinos? Poderia haver um componente genético relacionado à raça que está contribuindo para a deficiência de taurina em alguns desses casos?8 Causas nutricionais potenciais com taurina normal Pode haver deficiência de certos nutrientes que são alterados devido a interações nutriente-nutriente ou deficiência devido à biodisponibilidade reduzida. Isso pode ser uma preocupação especialmente para ingredientes exóticos que têm pouco ou nenhum teste, portanto, os nutrientes e a biodisponibilidade não são bem conhecidos, especialmente em comparação com os grãos, que foram bem pesquisados ​​na indústria de rações para animais domésticos. As causas investigadas para os casos em que a taurina é normal incluem outras deficiências nas dietas implicadas, como colina, cobre, L-carnitina, magnésio, tiamina, vitamina E ou selênio. Existem potencialmente ainda mais causas, como interações entre ingredientes e a microbiota intestinal.8 A taurina do sangue total pode ser afetada pela contagem de plaquetas, que pode variar dependendo do estado imunológico e da taurina do sangue total. A taurina do sangue total pode não refletir a taurina no músculo, incluindo o músculo cardíaco. Isso pode explicar por que alguns cães diagnosticados com DCM têm concentrações normais de taurina no sangue total.14 Efeitos antinutricionais Pouco se sabe sobre alguns desses ingredientes exóticos - poderia haver uma inclusão inadvertida de ingredientes tóxicos?6 É possível que efeitos antinutricionais possam levar ao DCM devido a desequilíbrios; portanto, o cão não receberia todos os nutrientes necessários. Fontes de carboidratos, como legumes e cereais crus, contêm fatores antinutricionais como inibidores de tripsina, fitatos, hemoaglutininas e polifenóis que podem diminuir a absorção de nutrientes e a digestibilidade da proteína. Cozinhar pode destruir esses efeitos antinutricionais. Por exemplo, o inibidor de tripsina pode ser destruído durante o processo de extrusão. A 150 ° C, o inibidor de tripsina diminuiu 94%. A reação de Maillard pode causar danos às proteínas pelo calor. Proteínas danificadas pelo calor podem superestimar a biodisponibilidade.13 Pensa-se que a reação de Maillard pode aumentar a degradação microbiana da taurina no intestino grosso. Uma empresa de alimentos para animais de estimação também precisa efetuar o processamento e a produção que podem afetar os nutrientes. Aminoácidos: Metionina, Cisteína e Taurina Metionina e cisteína são aminoácidos de enxofre. Juntos, eles são sintetizados para produzir taurina, principalmente no fígado. A metionina é um aminoácido essencial, o que significa que eles devem obtê-lo em sua dieta. A metionina é sintetizada para produzir cisteína, portanto a cisteína não é considerada essencial, a menos que não haja metionina suficiente para produzir cisteína. Se não houver cisteína suficiente, metade do requisito pode ser atendido com metionina, mas ela não pode substituir todos os requisitos, então ainda precisa haver um pouco de cisteína.14 O calor pode danificar e diminuir a biodisponibilidade da metionina. Portanto, é importante que o cão receba o suficiente em sua dieta alimentar.14 A metionina fornece enxofre para a pele, cabelo e unhas, produz adenosilmetionina (SAMe), diminui o pH da urina e é um poderoso antioxidante. A cisteína não é solúvel na urina, por isso pode formar cristais e urólitos. Urólitos de cisteína são raros e foram relatados em raças como buldogues ingleses e Newfoundlands. A metionina e a cisteína são encontradas em proteínas animais, como músculos, órgãos e ovos, com níveis mais baixos encontrados na caseína, grãos e leguminosas. Dietas com proteínas que são mal digeríveis podem não fornecer metionina e cisteína suficientes, mesmo se os níveis de proteína atenderem aos mínimos de AAFCO.15 A taurina é um aminoácido que contém enxofre. É sintetizado a partir dos aminoácidos sulfurados metionina e cisteína, principalmente no fígado e no sistema nervoso central. A taurina não é capaz de formar ligações peptídicas, portanto não é sintetizada em proteínas. A taurina é encontrada como um aminoácido livre em altas concentrações no coração; 60% do suprimento de taurina pode ser encontrado no coração. O calor pode destruir este importante aminoácido, portanto, isso deve ser levado em consideração ao desenvolver uma dieta completa e balanceada.16 A taurina é encontrada no coração, retina, fígado, cérebro, músculo esquelético, plaquetas, leucócitos e fluidos como o leite e em complexos com sais biliares.6 Existem baixos níveis de taurina no cordeiro. Ingredientes à base de plantas não contêm taurina. A taurina está envolvida na regulação da temperatura corporal; auxilia na absorção de gordura por meio da conjugação de ácidos biliares; e atua como neurotransmissor e neuromodulador no sistema nervoso central. Tem um papel na reprodução, no desenvolvimento fetal e cerebral e na função retiniana e cardíaca normal. A taurina também atua como antioxidante, estabiliza as membranas celulares e regula o volume e a osmolaridade celular.6 Pensa-se que a taurina ajuda na reabsorção de cálcio; portanto, se houver deficiência de metionina e cisteína com baixa síntese de taurina, isso pode esgotar os reservatórios de cálcio nas células cardíacas e impedir a contração adequada do tecido muscular cardíaco, possivelmente resultando em DCM.13 A deficiência de taurina inclui falha reprodutiva em rainhas, anormalidades de desenvolvimento em gatinhos, degeneração central da retina e cardiomiopatia dilatada.6 Carnitina A L-carnitina é um derivado de aminoácido ou substância semelhante a uma vitamina. Facilita a absorção de ácidos graxos livres na mitocôndria para produzir ATP. O corpo deve ter carnitina para a produção adequada de energia no músculo cardíaco. A L-carnitina é um poderoso antioxidante. Ele está envolvido em uma variedade de outras funções, incluindo o metabolismo da gordura. É sintetizado a partir de lisina e metionina principalmente no fígado.6 L-carnitina é encontrada no músculo; o coração e o músculo esquelético contêm 95% a 98% de L-carnitina no corpo. As deficiências de L-carnitina incluem cardiomiopatia. A maioria dos cães com DCM e deficiência de L-carnitina tem L-carnitina miopática, o que significa que têm um defeito no transporte da membrana que impede que L-carnitina suficiente se mova do plasma para o miocárdio. A L-carnitina não é encontrada nas plantas, portanto, uma dieta vegetariana pode ser deficiente.6 Dietas BEG As dietas que foram recentemente implicadas foram dietas BEG cunhadas por Lisa Freeman, DVM, PhD, DACVN, uma nutricionista veterinária internada na Universidade Tufts. A dieta BEG significa boutique, exótica e sem grãos. Eles são boutique (pequena empresa de ração para animais de estimação), exóticos (um alimento para animais de estimação que usa ingredientes não tradicionalmente usados ​​em alimentos para animais de estimação, como canguru, jacaré, bisão, feijão fava, tapioca, quinua, cordeiro [que tem cisteína com baixa biodisponibilidade] ou grão de bico) e livre de grãos (substituindo ingredientes de carboidratos de grãos por fontes de carboidratos vegetais, como batatas, ervilhas, legumes).8 Não sabemos muito sobre esses ingredientes. Eles estão diminuídos na taurina ou têm disponibilidade reduzida de taurina? Eles têm biodisponibilidade ou digestibilidade diminuída? Os grãos são pesquisados ​​há anos na indústria de alimentos para animais e gado; compreensão dos nutrientes e como o corpo digere são bem conhecidos. Não sabemos muito sobre os ingredientes exóticos; os nutrientes e a biodisponibilidade serão diferentes.8 As leguminosas têm sido mais usadas ultimamente, especialmente em alimentos sem grãos. Legumes são ingredientes como soja e favas; eles também usam leguminosas, que são as sementes de plantas leguminosas (ingredientes como ervilhas, lentilhas, grão de bico e feijão). As leguminosas têm baixo teor de gordura, mas são ricas em proteínas e fibras, por isso são um ótimo ingrediente para manter o teor de gordura baixo enquanto fornecem proteínas e fibras. Os legumes são ricos em lisina e pobres em metionina. Em um estudo usando soja com 15% de DMB, houve diminuição da digestibilidade da proteína. Foi relatado que as leguminosas constituem 40% ou mais da dieta.13 Dietas Completas e Balanceadas Ao desenvolver uma dieta completa e balanceada, o formulador deve levar todos os ingredientes em consideração. Se não se sabe muito sobre todos os nutrientes do alimento, do processamento e da produção, o alimento pode ser completo e balanceado no papel, mas não nos nutrientes reais, o que pode representar um problema para o cão. Declaração da AAFCO Se a empresa estiver nos EUA e vendendo em vários estados, além de muitas províncias do Canadá, ela deve seguir a AAFCO. O rótulo da ração deve conter uma declaração de adequação nutricional (declaração AAFCO). A declaração de adequação nutricional diz muito sobre como a comida era feita. A empresa de ração não pode alterar a declaração AAFCO; é uma declaração literal. Existem quatro estágios de vida reconhecidos: todos os estágios de vida (comida de cachorro / gatinho), gestação / lactação, crescimento e manutenção do adulto. Não há declaração de adequação nutricional para cães idosos / adultos. A declaração da AAFCO também informa como o alimento foi desenvolvido, por meio de alimentação experimental, formulado, familiar ou intermitente / suplementar. As empresas de alimentos para animais de estimação devem preencher uma declaração confirmando que concluíram um teste de alimentação, formulação ou produto familiar. Isso não é necessário para alimentos intermitentes / suplementares.17 Testes de alimentação da AAFCO Não há requisitos para fazer um teste de alimentação; depende da empresa. AAFCO define as diretrizes de como concluir um teste de alimentação. Um ensaio de alimentação inclui cães com o alimento de teste, um alimento de controle e um grupo de cães para desenvolver as normas da colônia para o trabalho de laboratório necessário. O consumo de alimentos e o peso são registrados, e o trabalho de laboratório é necessário. Um teste de alimentação de um adulto dura 6 meses e um teste de um filhote de cachorro dura 10 semanas. Um teste de alimentação mostra que a fórmula é completa e balanceada, como única fonte de nutrição. A cada cinco anos, uma empresa deve recertificar os testes de alimentação; eles precisam testar seis lotes diferentes de nutrientes. Para manter a declaração do teste de alimentação, 95% dos nutrientes essenciais devem ser idênticos aos nutrientes originais. Se a empresa não tiver o perfil nutricional original, ela precisará concluir um novo protocolo de teste de alimentação completa.17 Dietas formuladas pela AAFCO Um alimento formulado deve atender minimamente aos mínimos e máximos AAFCO, usando ingredientes complexos não purificados comumente usados. A última atualização dos perfis foi em 2016. De acordo com a AAFCO, há uma digestibilidade esperada e a empresa de ração deve levar em consideração as perdas durante o processamento e armazenamento. Os nutrientes são os esperados quando o cão ingere a comida.17 AAFCO intermitente / suplementar Os alimentos intermitentes / suplementares destinam-se à alimentação de curto prazo ou suplementar. Alimentos para animais de estimação rotulados como guloseimas ou lanches não precisam atender aos perfis nutricionais, a menos que sejam rotulados como alimentos completos e balanceados. Um alimento pode parecer completo e equilibrado, mas não é. É importante examinar a declaração de adequação nutricional para confirmar se está completa e balanceada. Se um alimento de bem-estar (pet shop ou mercearia) for um alimento intermitente / suplementar, ele não deve representar mais do que 10% da dieta total.17 Alimentando o Suficiente É importante certificar-se de que o cão está comendo o suficiente, ou seja, suas necessidades diárias de energia (DER) para o dia. Caso contrário, o cão pode ter deficiências potenciais em taurina e outros nutrientes, causando desnutrição potencial. Se comer o DER completo, a comida é completa e balanceada? Se o alimento for intermitente / suplementar, pode haver deficiências de nutrientes. Os donos de animais de estimação precisam ler a declaração de adequação nutricional (AAFCO) para garantir que a comida seja completa e balanceada. Recursos para veterinários e proprietários de animais de estimação Existem muitos recursos para veterinários, técnicos veterinários e proprietários de animais de estimação. FDA: Acompanhe os últimos relatórios da FDA, junto com os relatórios anteriores. www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/NewsEvents/CVMUpdates/ucm613305.htm Blogs: Dra. Lisa Freeman, uma nutricionista veterinária, tem um ótimo blog que a equipe de saúde veterinária e donos de animais de estimação acharão valioso. Petfoodology, Tufts Veterinary School. http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/petfoodology UC Davis — Dr. Josh Stern: Dr. Stern é um cardiologista veterinário internado que está estudando DCM e tem excelentes recursos para uso em clínicas ou para donos de animais de estimação; isso inclui trabalho de laboratório e sugestões de tratamento. www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/news/uc-davis-investigates-link-between-dog-diets-and-deadly-heart-disease Grupos fechados do Facebook: Existem algumas páginas excelentes do Facebook que fornecem suporte. Cardiomiopatia dilatada com deficiência de taurina (nutricional): Esta é uma página fechada para proprietários de animais de estimação, criadores, profissionais de veterinária e funcionários de empresas de rações. www.facebook.com/groups/TaurineDCM (editor VIN: o link original foi modificado em 1-31-20) Profissionais veterinários com deficiência de taurina: uma página fechada para veterinários ou técnicos veterinários. www.facebook.com/groups/355294525012651 Deficiência de taurina em Golden Retrievers: uma página fechada apenas para proprietários de Golden. www.facebook.com/groups/1257656451030324 Referência de cardiomiopatia com deficiência de taurina: uma página aberta que contém referências de DCM. www.facebook.com/taurineconcerns Taurine DCM — Site: Esses grupos do Facebook também têm um site; isso é especialmente ótimo se não for no Facebook. https://taurinedcm.org O que perguntar a uma empresa de alimentos para animais de estimação Muitos donos de animais estão confusos sobre o que alimentar seus cães. Muitos nutricionistas e cardiologistas internados recomendam procurar uma ração que siga as diretrizes da WSAVA (World Small Animal Veterinary Association). Em seus sites, eles têm perguntas a fazer à sua empresa de alimentos para animais de estimação. Estas foram propostas pela primeira vez pela AAHA (American Animal Hospital Association) em 201018 e a WSAVA lançou diretrizes em 2011.19 Peça ao dono do animal de estimação que ligue para a empresa de rações para fazer as perguntas sugeridas. 1. Você tem nutricionista veterinário ou equivalente na equipe de sua empresa? Eles estão disponíveis para consulta ou perguntas? 2. Quem formula suas dietas e quais são suas credenciais? 3. Quais de suas dietas são testadas por meio de testes de alimentação AAFCO e quais por análise de nutrientes? 4. Que medidas específicas de controle de qualidade você usa para garantir a consistência e a qualidade de sua linha de produtos? 5. Onde suas dietas são produzidas e fabricadas? Esta planta pode ser visitada? 6. Você fornecerá uma análise completa dos nutrientes do produto de sua ração mais vendida para cães e gatos, incluindo os valores de digestibilidade? 7. Qual é o valor calórico por lata ou xícara de sua dieta? 8. Que tipo de pesquisa sobre seus produtos foi realizada e os resultados são publicados em estudos revisados ​​por pares? Resumo A DCM nutricional está em alta. A preparação de uma ração completa e balanceada envolve muitas coisas, desde a formulação, digestibilidade e biodisponibilidade até a compreensão dos nutrientes nos ingredientes e no processamento e produção. Até entendermos o que está acontecendo, selecionar cuidadosamente a comida de um cachorro é importante. Os donos de animais de estimação precisam trabalhar com a equipe de saúde veterinária e fazer às empresas de alimentos para animais as perguntas recomendadas pela AAHA-WSAVA para encontrar um alimento para seus cães.
11 de dezembro de 2020 às 12:21
equipe
Cesar Souza
Moderador
Resposta:
Olá Chris, Desde que o FDA publicou esse artigo, diversos grupos vêm tentando identificar uma causa para isso. Muitos pesquisaram sobre a deficiência de taurina mas nenhum deles conseguiu identificar deficiência deste aminoácido. Um estudo (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30797439/) comparou cães com cardiomiopatia dilatada que eram alimentados com ração com e sem grãos. Apesar do grupo que comia ração sem grãos apresentar ventrículo esquerdo maior, outras medidas ecocardiográficas (fração de encurtamento, tamanho do átrio esquerdo) e numero de cães em insuficiência cardíaca não diferiu entre os grupos. A deficiência de taurina não foi encontrada em nenhum dos grupos também. O curioso deste estudo é que 7 cães que comiam dieta livre de grãos que tiveram suas dietas alteradas (sendo que 6 deles receberam suplementação de taurina) apresentaram melhora ecocardiográfica. No entanto, uma review publicada em Junho desse ano (2020), pondera que os dados que vêm sendo publicados a respeito do assunto não são padronizados - por exemplo, que os valores de taurina podem ser diferentes quando medidos pelo sangue ou pelo soro e esse fato não foi descrito - e alguns são conflitantes. Por enquanto, acredito que os dados em literatura não são fortes o bastante para afirmarmos que a dieta livre de grãos está associada à cardiomiopatia dilatada de alguma forma. Essa cardiopatia é uma doença multifatorial bastante complexa até os dias de hoje. Agradeço pelo tópico e me coloco a disposição para mais discussões construtivas como essa. Em anexo, a revisão em questão.
Anexos: 1
13 de dezembro de 2020 às 10:10
Total de anexos: 1
Desenvolvido por logo-crowd